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8 Common Golf Posture Mistakes and How to Fix Them

last updated April 2 0 comments

Introduction

When it comes to golf, proper posture is as essential as a trusty set of clubs. But what if your posture has more twists and turns than the fairway itself, leaving you struggling to hit the green? In this article, we'll tee up eight common golf posture problems, their sneaky causes, and how to straighten them out. So, grab your favorite cap, get ready to iron out those kinks, and get your game back on par!

Good posture for golf

Why Good Posture Matters for Your Golf Swing

Like the perfect backswing or a well-timed putt, good posture is crucial in golf. It ensures your body stays aligned and balanced throughout your swing, allowing you to generate power and control as smoothly as a freshly mowed green. And as a bonus, maintaining proper posture not only helps to keep you hitting those accurate and consistent shots but also reduces the risk of injury by keeping your muscles and joints in check. So, ready to get straightened out and swing away? Let's dive in!


Problem 1: Slouching

Causes

Ah, Slouching, the golf posture villain that loves to make your shoulders hunch and your upper back excessively bend like a question mark (commonly called swayback posture). This sneaky scoundrel can be caused by poor core strength, weak hips, fatigue, bad habits developed over time, sitting for long periods, weak upper back muscles, and tight chest muscles.

Solutions

To give Slouching the boot, sharpen your focus on improving your core (spine, pelvic, hip, and abdominal muscle) strength with exercises like planks, leg raises, and child’s poses. By doing posture exercises like these, you’ll be able to bring a straight back and relaxed shoulders to every swing. Additionally, you’ll find it easier to keep your body weight off your heels and more on the balls of your feet when addressing the ball. Incorporate stretches and exercises that target the upper back and chest muscles, such as rows, pull-ups, and chest stretches. And, of course, keep an eye on your posture throughout the day, especially while sitting, to avoid reinforcing poor habits.

Two posture exercises to help correct Slouching:

  1. Sitting Cross-crawling
  2. Sitting Elbow Curls
sitting cross crawling 2 Activ8 Posture

Sitting Cross-Crawling: Start by sitting up tall, rolling your hips forward onto your sit bones. Holding the arch in your lower back, raise one arm over the same shoulder in an arc with your arm straight. Simultaneously, raise the opposite foot off the floor from your hip. Lower the arm and leg, then do the same on the other side. Repeat on each side 20 times.

sitting cross crawling 1 Activ8 Posture
Sitting Elbow Curls Exercise Open Position

Sitting Elbow Curls: Start by sitting up tall, rolling your hips forward onto your sit bones. Holding the arch in your lower back, curl your fingertips into a golfer's grip fist and place your knuckles on your temples. Bring your elbows together in front of your face, rolling on your knuckles. Pull your elbows back past your ears, then together again. Repeat 30 times.

Sitting Elbow Curls Exercise - closed position

Problem 2: C-Posture

C posture in golf

Causes

Next up, we have C-Posture, Slouching's close cousin. This posture problem is characterized by a rounded upper and lower back, posterior pelvic tilt, and protracted shoulders, resembling the shape of the letter 'C.' Just like Slouching, C-Posture can be the result of poor core strength, weak hips, fatigue, bad habits, sitting for extended periods, weak upper back muscles, and tight chest muscles.

Solutions

To flatten out that troublesome C-Posture, you'll want to work on many of the same fixes as you would for Slouching. Strengthen your core, practice proper posture when addressing the ball, and target the upper back and chest muscles with specific stretches and exercises. By staying vigilant and working on your posture both on and off the course, you'll be able to wave goodbye to C-Posture in no time.

Two posture-correction exercises to help fix C-posture:

  1. Static Back Pullovers
  2. Airbench Pullovers
Static Back pullovers up position

Static Back Pullovers: Lie on your back with your hips and knees at 90-degrees, resting on a chair or bench. Extend your elbows over your chest and lower your arms overhead slowly. Repeat 40 times.

Static Back Pullovers down position
airbench pullovers 1 Activ8 Posture

Airbench Pullovers: Sit against a wall with your low back flat and your hips and knees bent to 90-degrees. Extend your elbows in front of your chest and raise your arms overhead slowly. Keep the arms straight as you bring the arms overhead, stopping where your back comes off the wall or if you feel discomfort.  Repeat 40 times.

airbench pullovers 2 Activ8 Posture

Problem 3: S-Posture

Causes

Meet S-Posture, the sneaky sibling of C-Posture, making its presence known through an exaggerated curve in your lower back—resembling a stylish 'S' when seen from the side. What's causing this mischievous bend, you ask? Look no further than tight hip flexors, weak glutes, or less-than-stellar posture habits.

Solutions

To tame that unruly S-Posture, it's time to limber up those hip flexors and give your glutes a much-needed workout. If you’re already working out, add exercises like lunges, glute bridges, and hip flexor stretches to your fitness repertoire. And don't forget to focus on maintaining a neutral spine when you're ready to swing into action, as this will help reduce the strain on your lower back and keep that sly S-Posture at bay.

Two posture exercises to correct S-Posture:

  1. Standing Quad Stretch
  2. Cats & Dogs
Standing Quad Stretch exercise

Standing Quad Stretch: Stand facing a wall with one foot propped up behind you, keeping the front of your thighs flush. The height of your foot in back will depend on how tight you are. Tuck your pelvis under (lift your belt buckle while tilting your sacrum down). Hold each side for 1 minute.

Cats and Dogs - dog position

Cats and Dogs: Start on all fours with your wrists under your shoulders and knees under your hips. Let your back and shoulder blades collapse down to start. Breathing out, round your back from head to tailbone. When you're out of air, drop your back and shoulders down to the starting position and breathe in. Repeat 10 times.

Cats and Dogs - dog position

Problem 4: Reverse Spine Angle

Golf problem reverse angle

Causes

Oh, the Reverse Spine Angle—a tricky little golf gremlin that sneaks in when you lean your upper body and head toward the target during your backswing. This uninvited guest can lead to awkward body rotation and poor contact with the golf ball, increasing your risk of injury. So, what's behind this mischievous move? Look no further than poor weight transfer, lack of flexibility, and weak lateral line stability.

Solutions

To banish the Reverse Spine Angle from your swing, it's time to work on your weight transfer. Make sure you're shifting your weight towards your back foot during your backswing as smoothly as a PGA professional's follow-through. To boost your flexibility, try incorporating exercises that help improve your range of motion (like those in our posture therapy program). And don't forget to strengthen your core muscles, as they'll play a crucial role in maintaining proper alignment throughout your swing, keeping that pesky Reverse Spine Angle at bay.

Corrective exercises for Reverse Spine Angle:

  1. Sitting Chair Twist
  2. Sitting Cross-Crawling
sitting chair twist Activ8 Posture

Sitting Chair Twist: Start by sitting up tall, rolling your hips forward onto your sit bones. Holding the arch in your back, place one hand behind you and the other hand across your lap. Use the shoulder behind you to rotate your spine and look over your shoulder. Hold each side for 1 minute.

sitting cross crawling 2 Activ8 Posture

Sitting Cross-Crawling: Start by sitting up tall, rolling your hips forward onto your sit bones. Holding the arch in your back, raise one arm over the same shoulder in an arc with your arm straight. Simultaneously, raise the opposite foot off the floor from your hip. Lower the arm and leg, then do the same on the other side. Repeat on each side 20 times.


Problem 5: Loss of Posture

Causes

Introducing Loss of Posture, the pesky golf saboteur that rears its head when your body angles change during your swing. This troublesome trickster can lead to inconsistent ball striking and reduced power, much to the delight of your opponents. The culprits behind this posture predicament include poor balance, muscle imbalances, and a lack of body awareness. And, while you might be able to achieve a neutral position in your golf setup, weak hip, pelvic, and spine muscles will lead to pulling out of your golf stance during your back- and downswing.

Solutions

To send Loss of Posture packing, focus on maintaining balance throughout your swing like a tightrope walker at the circus—distributing your weight evenly by using your core muscles. Identify and strengthen the weak muscle groups, particularly those in the legs and core, to keep your swing as steady as a pro golfer's nerves. Additionally, practice your swings in front of a mirror (or record on an app) to develop better body awareness and ensure proper alignment, making Loss of Posture a thing of the past.

Corrective exercises to fix Loss of Posture:

  1. Sitting Arm Circles
  2. Doorknob Stretch
Sitting Arm Circles forward rotation

Sitting Arm Circles: Start by sitting up tall, rolling your hips forward onto your sit bones. Holding the arch in your back, squeeze your shoulder blades back and down together and curl your fingertips into a golfer's grip fist. Raise your arms out to the sides and rotate your arms up and forward in dinner-plate-sized circles.  Do 50 circles, then turn your palms up and do 50 in reverse (up and back with the circles).

Sitting Arm Circles backward rotation
Doorknob Stretch - Left rotation

Doorknob Stretch: Start around a foot away from a wall or a door with your feet straight and hip-width apart. Then bend your knees and drop your hips, leaning your trunk forward close to 45-degrees (think sand wedge). Place an arch in your back and put the hand closest to the wall in the small of your back. Reach your opposite hand towards the wall (or doorknob), allowing your body to rotate. Pull the elbow closest to the wall up and back to promote rotation in your spine as well. Keep your feet and knees squared, then look over your shoulder as you rotate. Hold each side for 1 minute.

Doorknob Stretch right rotation

Problem 6: Overextending Arms

Golf mistakes overextending arms

Causes

Enter Overextending Arms, the golf swing's pesky party crasher that strikes when you straighten and rely on your arms too much during your swing. This unwelcome guest can lead to a loss of control and decreased power, as if you're trying to hit the ball with a wet noodle. The root of this problem often lies in attempting to generate power through your arms alone instead of harnessing the might of your entire body. A high center of gravity with poor posture going into your golf setup is a dead giveaway.

Solutions

To put Overextending Arms in its place, focus on grounding yourself in your lower body, dropping your tailbone, and then using your whole body as a powerhouse during your downswing. Engage your legs, hips, and pelvis to support you like a bear taking a squat in the woods. Practice with a relaxed, slight bend in your arms throughout the swing to prevent overextension and keep control, making Overextending Arms a distant memory on the golf course.

Posture exercises to fix Overextending Arms:

  1. Doorknob stretch
  2. Squat
Doorknob Stretch - Left rotation

Doorknob Stretch: Start around a foot away from a wall or a door with your feet straight and hip-width apart. Then bend your knees and drop your hips, leaning your trunk forward close to 45-degrees (think sand wedge). Place an arch in your back and put the hand closest to the wall in the small of your back. Reach your opposite hand towards the wall (or doorknob), allowing your body to rotate. Pull the elbow closest to the wall up and back to promote rotation in your spine as well. Keep your feet and knees squared, then look over your shoulder as you rotate. Hold each side for 1 minute.

Squat pose exercise

Squat (in Door): Find a sturdy door with firm handles or a door frame that will hold you. Line your feet up straight and hip-width apart, straddling a door or frame. Drop your hips as close to 90-degrees as is comfortable and roll your pelvis forward to create an arch in your lower back. Keep your spine straight up and pull your shoulder blades together, keeping the hips rolled forward and arch in your low back the whole time. Hold for 1 minute.


Problem 7: Inefficient Weight Shift

Causes

Introducing Inefficient Weight Shift, the golf swing's sly little speed bump that emerges when you fail to transfer your weight properly during your swing. This cunning culprit can lead to poor contact with the ball, open clubface, and reduced power, making your swing feel more like a gentle breeze than a mighty gust. Behind this stealthy swing saboteur, you'll find poor right-to-left weight distribution, lack of rotational strength, or improper swing mechanics. A few (fixable) poor posture deviations that will lead to power leaks:

  • Uneven pelvis (hip hike)
  • Uneven shoulders
  • Spine rotation
  • Trunk offset
  • One-sided dominance (right or left)

Solutions

To give Inefficient Weight Shift the boot, focus on improving your balance with exercises like single-leg deadlifts and balance board training—think of it as a golf-inspired circus act. Amp up your core strength to aid in proper weight transfer, making your swing as steady as a seasoned pro's. And for that extra bit of finesse, consider taking lessons with a golf professional to fine-tune your swing mechanics, sending Inefficient Weight Shift packing for good. Of course, most balance issues are rooted in poor posture so let’s get that straightened out first!

Corrective exercises for Inefficient Weight Shift:

  1. Sitting Cross-Crawling
  2. Foot Circles
sitting cross crawling 1 Activ8 Posture

Sitting Cross-Crawling: Start by sitting up tall, rolling your hips forward onto your sit bones. Holding the arch in your back, raise one arm over the same shoulder in an arc with your arm straight. Simultaneously, raise the opposite foot off the floor from your hip. Lower the arm and leg, then do the same on the other side. Repeat on each side 20 times.

Supine Foot Circles exercise

Foot Circles & Point-Flexes: Start by lying on your back and placing your hands behind one knee. Pulling your knee just past your hip, squeeze your shoulder blades together. Rotate your foot and ankle in one direction 30 times, then reverse directions with the same foot. Then, point your foot down and pull it back 30 times. When done with one foot, repeat on the other side 30 times in each direction and pointing & flexing.


Problem 8: Poor Hip Mobility

Golf mistake - tight hips

Knock knees (valgus stress) and external knee rotation are posture clues to tight hips.

Causes

Say hello to Poor Hip Mobility, your golf game’s vicious villain that swoops in to restrict your swing, limit your power, and sooner-or-later cause discomfort or pain. This sneaky foe often arises from sedentary lifestyles, muscle imbalances, or a lack of flexibility, turning your powerful swing into more of a timid tap.

Solutions

To send Poor Hip Mobility packing, it's time to limber up the lower body with stretches and mobility exercises. Focus on hip flexor stretches, glute activation exercises, and dynamic movements like leg swings, transforming your hips into a well-oiled, range-of-motion machine. With Poor Hip Mobility out of the picture, you'll be ready to swing into action with ease and power. Posture deviations that derail proper hip mobility:

  • Anterior pelvic tilt
  • External femur rotation
  • Valgus knees (knock knees)

Posture-correction exercises to fix Poor Hip Mobility:

  1. Standing groin stretch
  2. Knee drops
Standing Groin Stretch elevated exercise

Standing Groin Stretch - Elevated: Using a sturdy chair or bench, place one foot completely flat on the surface with the other leg on the floor behind your body. Make sure both feet are pointing straight ahead and bend the elevated leg so that the knee is 90-degrees. The knee should be over your ankle, so move your grounded foot back as able for more stretch. If comfortable with your balance, interlace your fingers behind your head and pull your elbows back, keeping your trunk upright as you lean forward into the stretch. Hold for 30-60 seconds on each side.

Knee Drops exercise

Knee Drops: Start by lying on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Slowly lower both knees to the ground in one direction (right or left), allowing the opposite hip to lift off the floor. Keep your upper body relaxed as you lift and rotate your legs back the other way. When returning to center each set, make sure your feet are lined up with your hips. Repeat slowly each direction 25 times.

The Perfect Setup: Fix Poor Posture Before You Get to the Golf Course with Activ8 Posture

Prep Work

Picture this: you're about to hit the golf course and want to play your best round today. And how do you ensure your posture is on point before you even set foot on that pristine green? Well, fear not, because we've got your back! By getting your posture game strong before you hit the links, you'll be one step ahead of the competition. And what better way to achieve that perfect golf posture than with individualized posture therapy from Activ8 Posture?

Limber Up

A little stretching goes a long way. Start by loosening up those tight muscles with some dynamic stretches that focus on balancing the muscles of your shoulders, chest, hips, and hamstrings. Not only will this help improve your flexibility during the round, but it'll also reduce the risk of injury once you start swinging.

Strengthen Your Core

A solid core is the foundation of a great golf posture, so don't neglect it! And what do we mean by "core?" This means the interaction of the parts of your whole body, but mainly the muscles of your hips, pelvis, spine, and trunk. A strong, functional core will provide stability and support during your swing, helping you maintain proper posture and alignment.

Check Yourself

Before you wreck yourself, take a moment to assess your posture. Stand relaxed in front of a mirror with your feet shoulder-width apart and your arms at your sides. Are your shoulders relaxed, your chest open, and your spine neutral and centered? Are both of your feet pointing straight ahead or out to the sides? Do your knees knock in or point out?

Good posture front view
Good posture side view

Mindful Practice

In sports like golf, you shouldn't have to "practice" keeping your body straight. Instead, you should show up having balanced your body so you can focus on nailing the next shot. When you're on the course, it's too easy to get caught up in the moment and forget about your posture. Sure, it's helpful to make a conscious effort to maintain proper alignment during your swing and take a moment to reset your posture between shots. But don't mistake being mindful of your posture as the same thing as being hyper-obsessed. Set yourself up for success before you take a swing by doing your posture exercises regularly.

Activ8 Posture: Your Personal Posture Pro

Want to go the extra mile? Consider working with the experts at Activ8 Posture. With our individualized posture therapy, you'll receive personalized guidance and exercises tailored to your specific needs. We'll help you identify any problem areas and create a customized plan to get you on the right track. With Activ8 Posture on your side, you'll be well on your way to a picture-perfect swing that'll make your golf buddies green with envy.

So there you have it! You'll be swinging like a pro in no time by addressing your posture before you get to the golf course and teaming up with Activ8 Posture.

Conclusion

So there you have it, folks! By unmasking and tackling these common golf posture problems, you’ll elevate your performance on the course and keep injuries at bay. And if you’re receiving golf instruction, help your golf pro by showing up with better posture and a body with the perfect setup for the golf shots you’ll learn.

Maintaining proper posture throughout your swing is as satisfying as a well-timed joke at a dinner party. So, practice these good habits both on and off the course, and you'll be swinging your way to golfing glory in no time!

FAQ

How long does it take to correct golf posture problems?

Well, my friend, just as Rome wasn't built in a day, neither is a perfect golf posture! The time it takes to correct golf posture problems depends on the severity of the issue and your commitment to swinging those changes into action. With consistent practice and exercise, you should start seeing improvements within a few weeks to a few months. But if you really want to speed up the process, fixing your posture before hitting the golf course and getting posture therapy from Activ8 Posture can make all the difference!

Can poor golf posture cause injuries?

Is Caddyshack a classic golf movie?! Yes, poor posture on or off the golf course boosts your risk of injury, especially when it comes to your back, hips, and shoulders. Keeping proper posture and alignment is like wearing your seatbelt on the course—it helps prevent injuries and improves your performance. Of course, you don't have to wait until you're on the golf course; work with Activ8 Posture to address your posture problems and keep injuries at bay.

Is it necessary to see a golf professional to fix my posture problems?

While it's not always a must, consulting a golf pro can be like calling in a superhero to save the day when it comes to diagnosing and correcting golf posture problems. For beginners, they can provide personalized instruction, golf tips, and guidance tailored to your specific needs with specifics like golf setup, proper ball position, and the right golf clubs, and maybe even some posture drills. And, if you’re looking to leave the pack of amateur golfers, working with a golf pro is a straight line to your goal. And why stop there? Combine the expertise of a pro with Activ8 Posture's personalized posture therapy, and you'll be a force to reckon with!

How often should I practice my golf posture?

If you have the bug for golf, practicing your golf posture is like brushing your teeth. You’ll do it at every opportunity. The critical thing to remember is to get your muscle imbalances taken care of for good posture in all that you do. The more consistently you remind your body of proper function and posture, and the fewer problems pop up! Aim to work on your posture every time before you hit the driving range or your favorite course. Incorporating posture exercises into your daily routine will keep your swing in tip-top shape.

Are there any tools or equipment that can help improve golf posture?

Absolutely! A whole world of gadgets and gizmos is designed to help you fine-tune your game for better golf. These include posture trainers, balance boards, resistance bands, and foam rollers. Pair these tools with targeted exercises and stretches, and you'll be well on your way to better posture and improved golf performance. But don't forget to take advantage of Activ8 Posture's expertise to ensure you're using these tools most effectively for your unique needs!

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